Jacob: The Patriarch of Imperfection

God had just made a covenant with a cheat. Jacob had just used deception to receive Isaac’s blessing, and he was on his way, on foot, to find a bride in the land of Padan-Aram. He had a blessing, a walking stick, the clothes on his back and that’s all. Early in the journey, not far from home, he lay down to sleep. That night his life changed. In a dream, the God of his father and grandfather extended the covenant He had made with them to Jacob. God had just made a covenant with a cheat.

Jacob fled to Laban to find a wife, but also to avoid getting killed by Esau. When Jacob saw Rachel, he probably thought to himself: “Hmmm… pretty girl! Let’s see. I have no money for a dowry, but if I commit to Laban that I’ll work for his daughter, that could work for me in more ways than one. I’ll not only get the pretty girl for a wife, but Laban will be obligated to protect me from Esau. Two birds with one stone, this could be really good!”

Actually, there was a third bird, but Jacob didn’t find that out for seven years. God (for reasons known only to Him) decided that Leah, not Rachel, was to be in the earthly lineage of Jesus, and Jacob found himself (a) with a wife he didn’t bargain for and (b) paying the same high price for her as for the wife he really wanted. To Jacob’s credit, and we often overlook this, he didn’t whine, pout or throw a hissy fit. He didn’t grab Rachel and escape into the night. He could have; he had a deal and Laban was the one who broke the deal. But Jacob didn’t do that. Why not?

You know, we’ve spent a considerable amount of time in the posts on this blog admiring God’s overlooking of our imperfections. And, of the heroes in the Bible, Jacob was probably the most imperfect of all. However, amidst all of Jacob’s questionable behavior, two things are easy to overlook: his resolute faith that God is true to His promises, and his unquestioning obedience to God’s instructions. Jacob took the trip to Padan-Aram in obedience to his father and mother (see Genesis 28). Then, when the Lord told Jacob to return to Canaan, he was on the road within 24 hours. That is obedience with a capital O!

In addition to obedience, Jacob also trusted the Lord totally. God told him at Bethel that He would take care of him, and Jacob trusted Him enough to work for free for 14 years. How radical is that? Honestly, I don’t know if I could trust the Lord enough to work for someone, especially someone as dicey as Laban, for 14 years, let alone for free. I mean, really! The only reason Jacob could do that is because he trusted his God. That is some serious trust! And look how the Lord rewarded that trust: after the 14 year slave labor contract, God made Jacob a millionaire in just six years. How? The Lord came to Jacob in a dream and told him what to do with the pregnant sheep at the drinking trough. Those instructions were pretty off the wall but Jacob, obedient and trusting, followed them to the letter. Seriously: who would have expected stuff in the drinking water to affect the color of the lambs born to the ewes drinking the water? That hasn’t been done before or since that event. So it had to be God, honoring Jacob’s faith and obedience.

God may love and covenant with people like us, who are imperfect. That is wonderful and reassuring. However, there is another side to this picture of love and grace: Our loving Father appreciates and enjoys it when we trust Him enough to surrender totally and obey completely, even if the instructions may at times appear a little off the wall to our puny brains. Moses trusted the Lord enough to obey and stretch out his staff over the Red Sea and divide it. Nobody had ever divided a sea with a rod before, so that was a pretty wacky instruction from a human standpoint. Moses obeyed, though, and the rest is history.

Do we trust God enough to obey Him when He gives us an off the wall command? Trust in the Lord with all your heart and lean not to your own understanding–isn’t that written in the Bible somewhere? It seems to me God is calling His children across the world to trust Him enough to obey Him when He says to trust Him for healing when that doesn’t seem likely, for provision when there seems to be no way, or for something else so impossible we can’t even mention it. He may take a detour, and He may wait a few more years than we think He should. But He has proven that he can be trusted.

So, what happened to Jacob when he obeyed the Lord and took off to return to Canaan? He got chased from behind by an angry Laban and he received word that Esau, the one seeking to kill him, was coming from his front with a whole army of men. Did Jacob sweat? You bet he did. Did he scheme and try to wiggle out of it? Sure he did. Did any of those actions make any difference? Absolutely none. God spoke to Laban and told him to leave Jacob alone. The Lord took care of everything. (Oh, by the way, He did that in spite of Rachel smuggling idols into the camp.)

If we surrender our lives to the Lord totally, trust Him completely and obey Him to the letter, we can sit back and drink that Diet Coke John Wimber used to talk about.

Cheers!

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